Roots Dig Deep at Farmacy Brewing with Justin Harrison

LISTEN TO Justin's EPISODE HERE OR FIND US ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCAST LISTENING APP!
 

 

Show Notes

Justin Harrison

Summary

On this episode of the Farm Credit AgVocates podcast, Katie Ward and Geoff Delamater sit down with Justin Harrison of Farmacy Brewing to learn how he turned his small home brew passion project into a large on-farm brewery and tasting room. We also dive into his background growing up on Willowdale Farm, his involvement in the local ag community, and the ins-and-outs of growing various ingredients for each craft beer. 

Visit Farmacy Brewing:

3100 Black Rock Road, Reisterstown, MD 21136
Friday 4-8pm, Saturday 12-8pm, or Sunday 12-6pm
 

Links

Transcript

Katie Ward:

Welcome to the Farm Credit AgVocates Podcast, I’m your host Katie Ward, ­­­­Public Relations and Communications Specialist for MidAtlantic Farm Credit.

Joining me today as my co-host is Geoff Delamater, Farm Credit Loan Officer in the Bel Air, Maryland branch. Geoff currently works with today’s guest and he is one of my LEAD Maryland Class 11 fellows. He is also a lover of craft beverages, which will come in handy during this episode! Thanks for joining us today Geoff.

Geoff Delamater:

Thanks for having me.

Katie Ward:

Earlier this month we celebrated National Beer Day and the ingredients grown by farmers that make up the beverage loved by many. It's only fitting that we follow it up by bringing on a guest to our podcast who not only knows beer, but also runs an on-farm brewery.

Justin Harrison is a fourth generation farmer in Baltimore County, Maryland who owns and operates Farmacy Brewing on Willowdale Farm with his family. A working farm, raising horses, cattle, hay, row crops, fruits and vegetables, Willowdale Farm strives to preserve the best of Maryland agriculture. Farmacy Brewing sits right in the middle of the working farm, surrounded by horses, fields and production. Without further ado, I'm excited to welcome Justin to our podcast today. Thank you for joining us.

Justin Harrison:

Thanks so much for having me.

Willowdale Farm and Farmacy Brewing

Katie Ward:

All right. Let's start off the conversation today by having you dive into the background of your farm, Willowdale and then the brewery and how it all started.

Justin Harrison:

The farm started out really in the early fifties with my grandparents. My grandfather and grandmother were married and they actually lived in a little house in the Pikesville area, and then they moved out to a place near the Maryland line. They only had the first farm for a few years and it really was just something to have away from the city. They found this spot and it really evolved like a lot of farms. It started out with the core acreage, and then they were able to buy parcels along the way.

As the family grew, different family members, aunts and uncles built a house or had a part of the farming operation here as well. My dad is a Veterinarian and continues practicing [as an] equine veterinarian, so we focused primarily on the thoroughbred industry here. That was something that he and my mother really changed when they moved out here.

Kind of coming full circle up to the brewery element, back in 2010, I finished grad school. I was out at Humboldt State, which is out in Northern California. I moved back and one of the things that we did just as an adjunct was to have a CSA, so we did Farmer's Markets. We sold to a lot of restaurants in the area and our very first year we had about 10 CSA shareholders that came and got their vegetables off the farm.

We grew that for about five years to where we had about 60 members. We were participating in a couple of Farmer's Markets and then we had about seven or ten restaurant accounts that we were delivering to every single week. We had the idea of evolving that component, the CSA Farmer's Market with craft beverages.

I was already a home brewer and I already had interest in it. I didn't really know where that was going to go as it was just a hobby, but I saw how difficult the farm market gardening was for a few people. The places that have done it well have 200 plus shares every year and they usually have very seasonal staff. They may have 20 people working seasonally. We were just family, so it was just four of us running everything.

The idea of the brewery kind of stemmed off of how do we evolve this and what's the progression here where we can still keep the farm the center focal point, but then maybe adapt or translate some of the ingredients that we were growing and put them into beer specifically.

There was a point in time where we looked at maybe a winery. We have a winery literally right over the hill, so that didn't make much sense. We looked at a distillery concept and the return was not really there. It's a very long-term process and more power to the folks that do it, but it didn't seem to blend with what we were trying to do. I was already on a homebrew scale, adding weird things like strawberry rhubarb, cucumber and tomatoes to incorporate it into beer in a way that could work without it tasting like a salad basically. So the brewery evolved from that.

Katie Ward:

So it was your passion that you had personally that you were able to grow and bring it onto the farm?

Justin Harrison:

Yes, and I would be remiss if I didn't say that when my wife and I were married and we went on our honeymoon, my dad actually picked us up at the airport. The whole ride home he was talking about seeing something on TV about Tom Barse and Milkhouse Brewery. He was saying this guy's growing hops and you do a lot of this stuff already, maybe you should look at this concept.

The irony there is that during the whole process of business, the business model and the planning, he was probably my biggest competition. Every turn was go back to the drawing board, rewrite, examine and reflect if it was a good thing. We had that idea and that initial discussion in 2015 and I also learned of a new bill that's coming through that that will actually allow Baltimore County to have Class Eight Farm Brewery licensing, because prior to that, you couldn't do it.

Katie Ward:

Okay, awesome.

Geoff Delamater:

Tell us a little bit about the name Farmacy. How did it come about?

Justin Harrison:

I had a business partner early on who is a Pharmacist at Union Memorial. We have since split and it's just my family and I now. With the concept of incorporating the medicinal elements of plants and incorporating the use of food as medicine, I wanted to have a name that really kept the farm center.

I didn't want to lose sight of the fact that we're still a working farm and I didn't really want to just use the name Willowdale because that's what we do with our horses and our cattle, that's the rest of the property. This was something kind of unique that at the same time fits like a puzzle piece into the rest of the farm.

The Tasting Room and Craft Beers

Katie Ward:

Great. Awesome.

Let's talk about the gorgeous tasting room that we're sitting in right now. If I am correct, it was once a 9-stall horse stable and now it looks like a modern day brewery.

Justin Harrison:

Yeah, it was. I wish I could say it had all this historic reverence, but it doesn't. In the early nineties, we were starting to see an expansion of the thoroughbred industry. This started out as nothing more than a storage barn for hay, because we had more animals that were coming on to the property, so we needed that storage.

We then added the floor out of the stalls and it was an overflow barn because we were working at the time with the Maryland Stallion Station which is right off Tufton Avenue. When they folded in 2008, it was this wave of reality where you knew nothing is permanent. We had a business partnership with them and it's gone, so now what are we going to do with this building. It was where we stored a lot of junk. It really was trash and old equipment that we didn't use for years.

The irony is we actually had our CSA pick up here. When this still had the stalls, we had one area that we would put all our refrigerators and cold storage for vegetables and stuff in. We would set up a table and a booth and customers would pull up, they'd walk in, they'd get their produce and they'd leave. That's how that whole thing started and evolved. As we looked at locations for this brewery, we didn't want to build anything, so it was fitting that we started this concept here, so let’s finish it and see where it goes.

Geoff Delamater:

How many beers have you created? How many beers do you have on tap?

Justin Harrison:

We have 12 taps and actually have a hard time keeping them filled, which I'm working on. Since our start, we have probably brewed somewhere around 75 to 85 different beers. There's a lot of variability and try to keep everything as seasonal as possible and that doesn't necessarily mean that it's always unique.

If you take an IPA, for example, there's IPA's that we do year round with a beer called Beet Box that has a beet juice in it. It's about 60 pounds per batch of beet juice that we grow. It’s a West Coast IPA so it has that citrusy element that blends really well with the beet juice that might be on year round. We've done stuff with spruce tips. We have Norway spruce around here and we can only get that in the spring, so it only comes out this time of year.

Katie Ward:

Wow. Is the beet juice IPA a reddish tint?

Justin Harrison:

It's like magenta color. It's actually one of the most beautiful beers we've done. It freaks people out because they look at it and think that it must be a sour or something like that.

Then they taste it and the hops jump out and you get the earthiness from the beets. It blends together as a little bit of sweetness to it, but it works well. That’s not on tap right now. It will be on tap in the next two to three weeks.

Katie Ward:

What is your favorite Farmacy Brewing Beer that you've ever brewed?

Justin Harrison:

That's tough, I have two and they are kind of opposites.  I have always had an affinity for stouts and darker beers. We have a beer called Sassy Love that's named after one of our mares. It's a Mexican chocolate stout. It’s kind of chocolatey and it’s kind of spicy. It has guajillo and fish pepper in it. Fish pepper is unique to the Chesapeake Bay region. It's a nice clean spice, but it's not a fiery beer.

Between that, and a beer on tap right now called Knowing A Ghost. It's a Belgian-style Wit. It’s like a perfect spring, summer, fall beer. It's named after a friend of ours that passed away too. It uses a lot of farm grown wheat. What’s kind of unusual is that we get to use a lot of raw ingredients, so this beer has 50% raw wheat in it.

A lot of brewers shy away from that because you're not sure what the turnout is going to be. It doesn't have the enzymatic activity there, but it works really well in that style and you can drink it all day long. It’s about 4.8%, so it’s an easy drink.

Katie Ward:

Awesome. That's very special too with the name.

To-Go Options

Geoff Delamater:

For the folks that want to take your beer home with them, what are your to-go options?

Justin Harrison:

We started initially with doing growlers and we had people that brought in their own glass growlers and we had really nice stainless steel ones. After COVID, we shied away from that. I'd like to get back to it, but it's tough because you really want to have a dishwasher and a way to sanitize everything.

We have growler cans right now and we use them. The problem is aluminum is really tough to find, so I'll get a palette of metal and I will hoard it and we'll use them as we can. We've been working a lot with the mobile canning company, so we do 4-packs to-go as well.

Katie Ward:

What size are those cans?

Justin Harrison:

Those are 16 ounces, so we do 16 ounce 4-packs. We're not quite at the production level to shift down to 12 6-packs. Because of the seasonality of our beers, if something comes out, we might be able to bring it back in one to two months, but it's not something that's always on the shelf.

When people go in and make a choice about what they want to buy that's in a 16 ounce 4-pack, it still conveys that it is a special edition or a one off or something like that.

Katie Ward:

You mentioned COVID changing your growler situation. I'm sure it's also changed the whole functionality of being at a brewery.

Do you have any online ordering or digital options that you been using?

Justin Harrison:

We do.  Like everybody else, when we were shut down, we switched over to that completely. We had online ordering, but we just finally set up the order and pay at your table. You swipe a QR code to pay so everything is contactless.

We still do the online ordering. That's everything from people that want to run in real quick on the weekends and pick up something. Or if we do something special, like around the holidays, we'll have extra days for people to come in. They know they may see family, so they want to get something extra and we'll do it that way as well.

Katie Ward:

Awesome. Do you foresee that sticking?

Justin Harrison:

Yes, totally. It’s interesting, as reactionary as you are to something like COVID, the local regulatory hurdles also shift. We've seen this change over where Maryland used to not let you ship alcohol and now they do.

There’s programs like Beer Me, which as we grow our inventory here, I hope to get on that. We're just a little too small right now, so it's tough to keep up with that, but absolutely. I think the marketplace in general, not just beverage purchasing, but everything is switching to ordering on a smartphone.

How the Beer is Made

Geoff Delamater:

I know you grow and incorporate a lot of the ingredients into your beer.

Can you explain your beer making process?

Justin Harrison:

The things that I've learned in the last couple of years, really two years almost of operation, is that you can't just take any recipe and just throw something into the base recipe. We literally talk and we have meetings here with staff every Monday morning.  We have a pow-wow of what did you experience this past weekend and what do you want to do moving forward?

We tie in where we are at the production level with everything up in the gardens. We talked about the beet beer and that wasn't the first time we had a couple of other beers where we wanted to figure out a way to incorporate beets. The first iterations were the food coloring. It's kind of pinkish, but it just tastes like an IPA. It was a good IPA, but that was it. You push forward without it blowing up in your face, so to speak.

I think that the things that I've enjoyed doing are taking a concept and then just going to the next level with that. We have a beer right now in cans called Sun Bleeds Red. It's a dark Saison, which is an unusual style and loosely based off a French farmhouse recipe. It’s a darker beer, with darker malts.

We actually have pumpkin, beets, sun dried cherry tomato in it. There's a little bit of cinnamon, so it adds warm spice, but then it's a very dry finishing farmhouse beer, very low hop presence. Those different vegetables with the herbs, spices and everything blends together to where you have this really different experience. At the end of it all, something has to taste good for people that want to come back, so you have that delicate balance.

Katie Ward:

I am sure it’s all trial and error too.

Justin Harrison:

Yes, definitely and we have been pretty fortunate as well. We switched over out of the home brew realm to this small three and a half barrel system. I kind of hate it right now because I double batch everything into seven barrel fermenters.

It’s twice the amount of work to get one tank filled, but starting out it actually was okay because we were lucky that we never really had to dump anything. We didn’t feel that enormous pressure of having $10,000 worth of ingredients going into this single batch that if I screw it up then we're done. This is pretty manageable to handle.

Katie Ward:

That's good.

Do a lot of the ingredients come from your farm or from other local farmers? What would you say is the percentage of the outsourced jobs?

Justin Harrison:

Full disclaimer, we don't grow hops here. That's usually the very first question I get.

Katie Ward:

That’s a little difficult to do in Maryland, right?

Justin Harrison:

We're not the best climate. The heat and humidity of the summer really stacks the cards against you. We already had established some other for lack of better term, holistic kind of practices. We have beehives all over the farm that my sister takes care of them. We have pollinator habitat, an orchard, a couple high tunnels of greenhouses and a lot of other things going on.

To then go in and take over some field area to put hops in and start spraying to prevent fungal diseases, it just didn't work. So we do buy our hops. I actually feel pretty strongly about that, just because there's so many choices out there.

Every other brewer has access to every ingredient on the planet, so why should farm breweries limit themselves. If I had to put a number on it, we're typically somewhere in that 40 to 45% range that we're growing stuff and harvesting it here.

We try to use a lot of raw ingredients. We have oats and wheat that we're using and I have barley and rye in the ground. We'll alternate back and forth depending on the plot. That allows us at our scale still to incorporate some of those ingredients.

We also work with local malt houses. Dark Cloud Malthouse just moved up to Westminster. They are a place where we can take our grain and they'll malt it for us. It’s nice because we're both right around the same scale, so I can take one of those grain bins on the back of my pickup truck, drive over, and drop that off. That's relatively a batch size for them to then turn over to whatever I want, which works out very well.

Being Involved in the Ag Community

Geoff Delamater:

To change direction a little bit here, I know you have a young family. I know you have children that are involved with farming and 4-H.

Do you have any type of Ag education opportunities for children on the farm?

Justin Harrison:

Formally no, but I think that I'd argue that experiential education is probably better than anything you could get in a formal setting. I think one of the things we've tried to preserve here and I get feedback from our customers, is being able to come out here as families and bring their children along.

They get to walk around and see the horses, which maybe is the first time they've ever done that. They can go up and see the greenhouses or what's growing in the garden and maybe it's the first time they've ever done that. Parents get the social aspect because everybody knows everybody. They might see someone from their child’s daycare, school or whatever.

They meet up here and they can hang out. It becomes a little bit more of an outdoor social setting, which is nice, especially with young families. Having my daughter be able to walk over here from our house because she knows daddy's in the brewery and she knows what's going on. She's going to go see her horses and she's going to go feed her cows. She's two and a half and it’s wild to just have that experience and to know that it's actually registering and that she gets it. Other children that come here, it's the same thing, and they get it too.

Katie Ward:

Speaking of events and this being an outdoor venue on the farm, do you have any events planned for the summer? I know you host meetings here and you mentioned food trucks earlier.

Do you have any plans?

Justin Harrison:

We actually have our Farm Bureau meeting here on Monday. We've been really pushing to get back in touch with everybody. We've done everything virtually since shut downs last year and I actually cannot wait because we just put it out there.

We have to have an in-person meeting, everybody will be spread out, but we just need to be able to have that face-to-face interaction to get our work done. I was blown away because almost everybody on the board said yes, which is great, because you have that commitment now.

Geoff Delamater:

You didn’t have to twist their arm too much (laughing).

Justin Harrison:

(Laughing), yes, exactly. Come to a brewery for our Farm Bureau meeting so that you can participate, instead of just being at your iPad screen or whatever. We are going to shift back in the summertime where we'll do Friday night Farmer’s Markets. We always have a food truck, so right now we're booked out with food trucks Friday - Sunday from here until at least the end of August.

On Fridays we try to double up where you can come out and it’s a little bit lower key. We're only open for a few hours on Friday and there's food truck and music normally. You can grab some vegetables or talk to us about what's growing in the garden. That is kind of something that's unique that we always try to incorporate.

This year has been a little tricky to plan, but we've done some other neat stuff with other organizations. We’ve hosted fundraiser events and things like that with a couple of groups in Hampstead with raffle tickets and such. We want to incorporate as much of the community as possible without you feeling pressured into anything.

Geoff Delamater:

You mentioned your daughter coming down and feeding your horses and your cows and she knows you're in the brewery.

How did growing up on a farm with your dad as a veterinarian shape your career path and your future?

Justin Harrison:

I don't think if you had asked me that 30 years ago, that I would have said that I'm going to open a brewery on the farm. There was a point in time where I was thinking that I was going to go into veterinary medicine. Right now we're in the middle of foaling season and almost every night we have a mare foaling. I'm usually the one that actually gets the alarm and hears everything.

By the time my dad gets down there, I've already delivered the foal. My sister comes over from her house to help out too. We’ve just grew up in it and we are actively still a part of it. I think that with being here though, one of the things that I now can appreciate so much more is the value of open space and all of the environmental elements that come from that fresh air and clean water.

Knowing, seeing, and living where agriculture has been vilified and everybody wants to go in their little camp where you're either organic or not organic and asks how we do things. I think for us, I was able to take a step back and have the old school point of view. There are some very radical, progressive point of views and just meet somewhere in the middle where I can kind of understand that because I've lived on both sides, so to speak.

Katie Ward:

How has your involvement in the Ag community also helped you with your brewery?

I know you and I met years ago through Maryland Farm Bureau events and you were part of the Young Farmers Committee, and now you are President of the Baltimore County Farm Bureau.

Could you talk a little bit about your involvement in the community?

Justin Harrison:

This year in particular with COVID has been difficult, but prior to that and one of the things that I think is tough to have the conversation about what's involved in farming with somebody that hasn't lived it. You try to have partnerships and some people say their job is really stressful; getting there at 9:00 a.m., can't leave until 5:30 -6 p.m., but I get an hour lunch break.

To me, that's unreal and it sounds awesome. I don't know the last time I didn't eat lunch in my truck driving somewhere on a run. I think that the community is just keeping it real, or at least knowing that the core is Ag and that it's still farm life. We are very lucky out here. Its farm families, its people that have farm land and they understand that.

Bringing people out that have never seen that before and now you get the opportunity to help them understand that it's not all this bad negativity, that there is a whole other side of it. In this day and age, it is tough to have a cordial conversation without going down a political rabbit hole.

We do have a lot of people stoking the fire and that's what attracts attention. It can be negative and it can be angry, but that's not really the right thing. We have these local communities and that's a relative term.  The community radius is not just from here up the road two miles or five miles, it can be all of Baltimore County, it can be Maryland or it could be the Eastern seaboard. We get a chance to share with other people and people that have never had that chance to come out and see it for the first time.

Geoff Delamater:

With your involvement with Baltimore County Farm Bureau, I'm sure you see a lot of trends.

What would you say is your biggest opportunity for the farm and also for the brewery?

Justin Harrison:

I honestly think that that's shifted probably 180 degrees from a year ago. I think prior to that, one of the things that I know with Farm Bureau that we struggled with was just attention; that's probably the simplest way to put it. It's this stupid smartphones that everyone wants instantaneous gratification all the time and if anything takes more than a few seconds, then you're wasting my time kind of attitude.

One of the things we've struggled with on the farm is to get people's attention. In the horse industry, I’ll be the first to admit it’s a little bit of a cottage; everybody knows everybody, and everybody has worked together at some point. People were buying hay from this person who is buying horses from that person and gets training from that person. It goes around in circles.

When you look at agriculture and talk about food, I think it's the same. We know people that run organic market gardens and everybody knows everybody. It's tough to break in, it's a big hurdle. I think what is probably going to continue to be the biggest challenge is just having an opportunity to talk to people and having that opportunity where you can express facts, because there's a lot of misinformation out there too. That's tough because once you're up against that, you unfortunately spiral into this little world of doubt and that's a really tough uphill battle when you're trying to unravel that mess.

Katie Ward:

It's great that you recognize that as a producer yourself, because it's hard to articulate and feel like you're put in a corner and then have to explain your practices when you know that they are environmentally friendly and that they're safe for consumers.

Driving up the lane to get to the brewery, you see the fields and you see the horses, so as a consumer not knowing anything about Ag, it puts you in that mindset before you even stepped foot into the brewery. The fact that you are here on the weekends working, and you're the one growing all the ingredients, it's the perfect place for a consumer to come, who needs any kind of education or has any kind of questions.

Justin Harrison:

Right and we try pretty hard to have that full circle conversation. You’re right, you come in the lane and that's for lack of a better term, that's the show portion. The first building you go by is our farm office, and it’s our foaling barn, so there’s a lot of mares and foals in there. That's what people are attracted too.

Then you come through the rest of the farm and you realize behind this building is basically the guts of everything. We’ve got a lot of hay fields and crop fields that are in the back 40, although it's really more like the back 100. We also have cattle and you don't really even see them because they're on the other side of the building.

When you come to the brewery, if you sit in the back, you can see them. I often I find myself explaining to people that they are my herd and that it’s not somebody else's farm or another property. The grain that comes out of here goes to them. They get rotated out on to temporary hayfields, so they help to fertilize or plant whatever for putting hay out. Then we harvest hay or grain off of that and then it can be used back in the brewery or fed to the horses or whatever other options we have. It’s tough to say it's holistic, that is a played out term.

Katie Ward:

Yes and seeing it helps.

Justin Harrison:

Yes, exactly.

Advice for Someone Starting a Brewery

Geoff Delamater:

I'm sure, you know, the craft beer industry is rapidly growing, especially with the farm breweries.

What advice would you give to someone that wants to start a brewery or get into the business?

Justin Harrison:

Prepare yourself and make sure your stomach is ironclad. I started everything, like I was saying at the beginning, we had the initial conversation in 2015, so I didn't even get my use and occupancy permit until 2019.

There were moments throughout that whole thing where I thought “screw it, I'm done.” It can be so complicated, so frustrating. I think because I was a guinea pig in some element, but now there’s something to go off of. We kind of set the precedent with being not only a working farm and keeping it that way, but then also having a MALPF (Maryland Ag Land Preservation Foundation) as our land preservation group, we worked with them initially.

We work with the Valleys Planning Council on a lot of things as we were kind of evolving our model and how this was going to affect the local Ag community. All of those little things were building up. For somebody now to come in, it's a journey, it's a long process, but I think there's so much diversity out there too in craft beverages. Not just craft beer, but I think craft beverages is a way to reference it now.

You can find your niche and that's probably the most important thing. You need to figure out what makes you unique and what you are good at. If you can identify that, and then they align, you're going to succeed.

Geoff Delamater:

You need to make a beer named Trailblazer.

Justin Harrison:

(Laughing) yes, sure.

Katie Word:

Yes or Guinea Pig.

Justin Harrison:

We will have to come up with something.

Lightning Round

 

Katie Ward:

Awesome.

We always like to do a fun little game on the podcast called the Lightning Round. I'll ask you a couple of this or that and either or questions. Don't take time to think about it, just fire out your answer. We don't need to explain it. We'll just move right onto the next explanation.

Justin Harrison:

Okay, so no explanation. Don't be wordy, got it.

Katie Ward:

Yes, so as fast as you can - a flight or one beer?

Justin Harrison:

One beer.

Katie Ward:

Lager or ale?

Justin Harrison:

Lager.

Katie Ward:

Fruity or hazy?

Justin Harrison:

Hazy.

Katie Ward:

Drinking beer from a can or a glass?

Justin Harrison:

A glass.

Katie Ward:

What is a beer’s best friend, pizza or wings?

Justin Harrison:

Pizza.

Katie Ward:

A brewery game, bingo or trivia?

Justin Harrison:

Trivia.

Katie Ward:

A brewer’s swag, having a beard or wearing a flannel?

Justin Harrison:

Can I say neither?

Katie Ward:

Yeah.

Justin Harrison:

(Laughing) yeah, neither.

What do you Advocate for?

Katie Ward:

Okay, neither it is. Well that was fun, thanks a lot.

Before we end our conversation, we always like to ask our guests the same wrap up question at the end of every episode.

What do you advocate for an agriculture?

Justin Harrison:

Having an honest, genuine future. Being able to practice what you preach and being comfortable with that and knowing that you can go to sleep every night with that. Knowing that what you're doing is actually going to be around and be a positive influence on the future, because I don't really think we have much else after that.

Katie Ward:

Well, I appreciate that. Thank you for your time and for sharing your farm and brewery with our followers today.

How can our listeners find you the brewery online? We will link all of this on our podcast website and in the show notes, but if you just want to give a shout out to how they can find you.

Justin Harrison:

We have websites as farmacybrewing.com, but you can also do Instagram, Facebook and I’m pretty sure we have Twitter, everything is kind of linked together. Instagram is usually the best way because we're always trying to update that and keep up with new pictures, new info, stories and everything else.

Katie Ward:

Great.

Where is the brewery located?

Justin Harrison:

It is right in the middle of our farm – 3100 Black Rock Road. It’s Reisterstown, Maryland, but it's really closer to Butler, its dead center on the farm.

Katie Ward:

What are your tasting room hours? I know you've mentioned Friday evenings, Saturday and Sunday.

Justin Harrison:

Yep, it's Friday, 4 – 8; Saturday, 12 - 8; and Sunday, 12-6.

Katie Ward:

If all you listeners want to come in to Farmacy Brewing, make sure to mention Justin or the Farmacy Brewing’s staff that you heard about them on the Farm Credit AgVocates podcast. Thank you again for your time, Justin, and I hope you guys have a great spring and summer here on the farm.

Justin Harrison:

Thank you so much.

Katie Ward:

Thank you also to Geoff for being a great co-host with me today. Your knowledge of the industry and from working with Justin gave us some good insight. I know our listeners will enjoy hearing a new voice on the podcast today as well, so hopefully you can join us again soon.

Geoff Delamater:

Great, you are welcome.

Katie Ward:

Thanks everyone for listening to this episode. Please remember to rate, review, subscribe, and share this with a friend. You can get your podcast notes and subscribe to all email alerts at mafc.com/podcast. Do you have a suggestion for a topic or a new guest? Send them our way via email to podcast@mafc.com Have a great week and keep on advocating.