Showing Up: Johanna & Morgan's Top 5 Fair Lessons

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Show Notes

Johanna Rohrer

Summary

On this episode of the Farm Credit AgVocates podcast, Johanna Rohrer and Morgan Figgins go back in time to discuss the life lessons they learned while showing livestock through 4-H and FFA. From how they got started to where they are today, you won’t want to miss the tips and tricks they picked up along the way.

Jo and Morgan also dish all of the details about the 2021 Virtual Showcase Contest and how to enter!

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Transcript

Johanna Rohrer:

Welcome to the Farm Credit AgVocates Podcast. I'm your host, Johanna Rohrer, Outreach and Educational Program Specialist at MidAtlantic Farm Credit.

Morgan Figgins:

And I'm your cohost Morgan Figgins, Marketing and Digital Communication Specialist at MidAtlantic Farm Credit.

Johanna Rohrer:

On this episode, we're going back in time to talk about the impact 4-H and FFA had on our lives. From raising livestock animals to competing in public speaking competitions, we'll be talking tips, tricks, lessons learned, and how these organizations still impact us now. We'll also be giving you all the details about the launch of this year's 2021 Virtual Farm Credit Showcase and how to enter. Morgan, how long have you been working with Farm Credit and what role do you play in the Marketing department?

Background of Johanna and Morgan

Morgan Figgins:

I actually worked with MidAtlantic Farm Credit as a Marketing Intern for about three years throughout college and I'm super excited to have recently returned as the Marketing and Digital Communication Specialist.

In my role, I handle more traditional marketing requests like our print advertisements, some fun things like our social media graphics, digital marketing and reporting assistants, help with email marketing, photography at our testimonial video shoots and content development. Jo, how long have you been with MidAtlantic Farm Credit and what role do you play?

Johanna Rohrer:

Yeah, Morgan, I've been with MidAtlantic for three and a half years. For the first three years, I focused the majority of my time serving as the Divisional Marketing Specialist for what we call our PMV division, so Southeastern Pennsylvania, Central Maryland, and then down into the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. I worked closely with the sponsorship events and also actual customer events, along with sales team marketing efforts.

But in March I transitioned into the role of Outreach and Educational Program Specialist, where now I'm focusing the majority of my efforts on customer education and engagement. So this leads us to talking a little bit about our background and where we came from before we came to Farm Credit.

So, Morgan, question for you, brief introduction about yourself, where are you from, where were you located in the MidAtlantic region, what's your experience in ag showing livestock and let's touch on that 4-H and FFA experience.

Morgan Figgins:

Sure. I am born and raised in Frederick, Maryland, and I still currently work out of the Frederick office. I graduated from University of Maryland Global Campus in 2019 with my Bachelor of Science in Marketing. I started showing in open class at The Great Frederick Fair when I was about five years old as a Clover because I saw my older sister doing it.

As soon as I was old enough, I joined 4-H and started showing my swine projects and showed them all 10 years of my 4-H career. I joined FFA my senior year of high school and had the opportunity to represent the state of Maryland for the Agricultural Communications CDE with my team members at the 2016 National FFA Convention.

Prior to COVID, I was a volunteer judge for the educational poster exhibits at The Great Frederick Fair. Jo, I'd love to hear some of your background, where you're from, where you're located, your experience in Ag, livestock showing and all the details about 4-H and FFA.

Johanna Rohrer:

I grew up on a multi-generation farm operation in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. I'm a graduate of Penn State University with a degree in Agricultural Sciences and then I coupled that with a dual minor in Leadership Development, as well as Education.

I grew up showing in the Lancaster County 4-H Livestock Club, and then later transitioned in ninth grade to attend Manheim Central High School where I joined the Manheim FFA. And like I said, really focused my efforts on the swine and sheep show ring throughout my show career. But when I was 16, I had the awesome opportunity to represent the state of Pennsylvania in both the 4-H and FFA National Livestock Judging Contest.

At that time, both of those competitions were held in Louisville, Kentucky. That's really where I got exposed to multiple species was through livestock judging. I knew later on in life that attending college and competing on a Senior College Livestock Judging team was something that was important to me. So I was a member of the 2009 Penn State Livestock Judging team, where we traveled and competed throughout the United States.

Today in my spare time, I enjoy judging some local shows and also helping to coach our local forage program. So I very much stayed involved in the livestock industry, more from an educational standpoint than necessarily a production or a breeding standpoint, but really a space that is near and dear to my heart.

Morgan Figgins:

Very fitting for your current role at MidAtlantic Farm Credit. Now, moving forward, Jo and I are going to name our top five fair lessons. Jo, would you like to kick it off or do you like me to start?

Top Five Fair Lessons

Be a Learner and a Listener

Johanna Rohrer:

I'll start. I think my first lesson that I want to talk about is to always remember to be a learner and to remember that being a learner also means that listening is really important.

The reason why I feel like that's so important is I think back to the first time I ever showed a sheep in showmanship. I was really young and my family, my parents did not grow up in the show ring, so my brother showed and I showed, but we were kind of learning as we were going. I remember going into the ring with my lamb and I used a halter, but I draped the halter over its neck because I really didn't need the halter.

That particular judge, literally one of the pieces of constructive feedback that he gave me was, if you think you can come into the show ring and you don't need a halter, maybe its okay to take it off, like you could probably handle this without a halter and you may have improved your placement today in the showmanship class.

So when I talk about always being a learner I think that's important as you grow through your fair projects, your 4-H and FFA experience. But then also being willing to listen to that constructive criticism is really important. So Morgan, let's hear your first tip.

Take Pride in What You Do

Morgan Figgins:

So my first tip is to take pride in everything that you do. You never know whose watching, whether it's one of the younger showman or if it's a member of the public, because you have to remember that for some people you are representing their only view of agriculture that they have. And it's important to put our best foot forward.

Are you ready for lesson number two?

Have Fun and Make Friends

Johanna Rohrer:

Yeah, my next lesson is one that I am pretty passionate about now, because I think when I was younger, I might not have embraced this the way that I should have. I think it's important to have fun and I think it's more important to also make friends through your process. You're not just competing with each other, I've looked through these tips through the lens of having shown almost 15 to 20 years ago.

That's a long time and when I think about my closest friends are now the colleagues that I work with in agriculture, they're also the people I went to college with, and they’re the people who were involved in college clubs with and on competitive teams with.

So when I stepped back and looked through it through the experience, I would just recommend, make sure you're making the most of that moment and still having fun and making good friends. I know we had the privilege to travel with a really competitive livestock judging team in 2018 and although this isn't particularly directed at fairs, that group of kids had such a great experience because they had fun.

We spent so much time laughing and joking around and just enjoying the moment. When they look back on their experience, they talk about how rewarding those moments where. So just remember to always have fun and make good friends.

Get Out of Your Comfort Zone

Morgan Figgins:

Going along with that and making the most of your opportunities, I think it's very important to go outside of your comfort zone. You never know what additional opportunities you're going to open up. That could be as simple as extending a warm welcome to a new exhibitor or someone that you haven't talked to before that you've always showed with and going up and making that connection because you don't know where it will take you.

To Be and Stay Humble

Johanna Rohrer:

I think back to my time showing and the amount of people that I met throughout the process, they taught me so much through the process. I think that's a great one. My next one would be to be and stay humble. I think this is hard sometimes because everybody wants to do well. Right? Everybody goes to the show, and for a lot of youth, we kind of like prime them that the goal is to be championed.

So the goal is to do well, the goal is to grow. But the goal is to do that in a humble way. There are going to be things that happen along the way. I think back to a couple of shows that I went to later on in my teen years and I knew I had a pretty good chance of being competitive in those experiences, but like some bad things happened. My pig might've gotten sick or my pig ended up getting an injury and things didn't quite work out the way that maybe I thought that they should have. So I think having that sense of humility when you are in the show ring is important.

And a couple of things from the judge's perspective, I really appreciate when I see other youth exhibitors, congratulating each other. I think that it's important to celebrate the moment, especially in a championship drive. What's better than being out in the ring with the four or five best animals that have been in that show?

It's just an opportunity to celebrate not only the quality and the achievements, but also to support each other and to stay humble in that moment because ultimately one person is going to be named champion and the rest aren’t. So it is a moment that I just really try to encourage people to stay humble. Things happen, but it's all about how you handle them.

Be Confident in Your Decisions

Morgan Figgins:

Absolutely using those experiences to come together, instead of letting them divide you. I think my next lesson would be, to be confident in your decisions and learn how to stick to them, no matter if the outcome is good or bad. I have a few instances that come to mind. I think of trying new feed programs and maybe it didn't work out great and the animal didn't fill out, wasn't market ready and I placed lower in a class.

Then I think of good decisions that I made. Like when you go, every show kid knows this feeling, you're all excited, you're going to a barn, you're going to a sale and you go to scope out the new material, what animals are ready and who you think is going to be the best of the best when you're purchasing your livestock animal.

I remember very vividly, I was eleven years old and I had a couple people try to sway me away from this one pig that I was really focused on. He was a really good looking barrow, but he was the runt of the litter. He was probably about 50 pounds lighter than every other pig there, but I stuck to it. Six months later, with a really strict feed program and throwing a lot of supplements his way to help him gain that weight, it just so happened that we had a judge that liked that lighter build and a pig who was quick on his feet. He ended up winning grand champion market hog for that show. So it just really instilled in me that once you make your decision, you need to stick to that decision and roll with it and see it the entire way through.

Compete Your Own Race

Johanna Rohrer:

I love that because I think decision-making, there's always consequences that come with them. Sometimes it's positive, but also sometimes they can be really challenging. I think if you in your heart feel like, I'm making the best decision and it's the most informed decision, and you've reached out to those resources, commit to it and follow it through. So my next step would be to compete your own race.

What I mean by that is, it is great and it is good to generate your own goals for each show. So if you're a new beginner just starting out, this is your first fair. I remember when I went to my first fair, I was like, all I want to do is not be last. My goal was to not be last and guess what? I wasn't last in showmanship, I've been last a few other times in some shows and again, the humility piece comes into play. It wasn't your day, it wasn't your moment, and that's okay. Walk away and start over again.

But I think setting your own goals, and for me, I always really tried to focus on making those improvements. So say I went to a show and I didn't necessarily get the results that I was looking for, I would really go back to my program and look to see, what could we change? What should we improve? What did that constructive feedback really mean? How can I adapt that to my project? I think if you compete your own race at a show, it lets you focus on the individual development of growth. I think that that's really important to encourage to your young people.

Life Isn’t Always Fair

Morgan Figgins:

I agree. My sister and I were also first-generation showman and you're at a slight disadvantage from the families who come from generations and generations. I think it's super important to have goals that you can actually achieve, that are realistic and obtainable. That it's important to set yourself to a high standard, but you don't want to set yourself to a standard so high that it's not realistic and you're not going to achieve it. So I think it's super important to go along with that lesson.

My next lesson is that life isn't always fair as livestock show kids. We know that, we've seen it growing up, we've seen it with different judges, different decisions, just animals getting sick, animals getting hurt right before the fair. It's not always easy, but it's important to take those things with grace because going back to one of Jo's first lessons, you want others to have a good experience as well.

You don't want to react badly and end up ruining someone's grand champion experience or someone's first show. You want to make it as good of a situation as it can be. I think it's super important to just remember, to step back from what may not be fair or what may be a very difficult situation to deal with and approach it with your best foot forward.

Show Up

Johanna Rohrer:

I absolutely agree. Actually, you talking about this particular tip brings me back to a moment, two moments particularly in my show career. One, when I felt like I went to the fair with the best animal and another, when I went to the fair and I didn't have the best animal, but I was named champion.

When I look back, this comes back to how humble are you when you accept that opportunity to be named champion at the end of the show or as a class winner or whatever the overall goal is. So we talked about the goal, it doesn't always have to be champion and it really does come back to how you handle the moment and ultimately being a good competitor and being a supportive competitor of each other is something that I would always encourage.

So my last tip is to show up. The competition in a show is really, once you get in the ring, it's about you, your project and the judge, the person that's evaluating your project. I see this a lot where you see young people really comparing themselves to other people and I did it myself. When looking back, I think this is one of the spaces where I really started to just focus individually sort of on that growth, that vision minded, like what were my future goals, because there are always going to be some naysayers out there that might naturally want to put you down.

I think it's important to just remember that the way that you act and how you compete is the way that people are going to remember you. And again, coming back to one of my other tips, eventually these people might be your coworkers. They also might be community members, or they can become your boss. You never know how you're going to run into this network again, or you might need to ask one of them for help sometime. So I think just remembering to show up and really to keep it simple it's about you, your project and the judge and doing your best.

Expect the Unexpected

Morgan Figgins:

Very true. You're the one that has to go home with yourself and your animal project at the end of the day. You want to be able to walk away from that show, knowing that you did your best and you gave it your all. My last lesson for all of my fair lessons, it's hard to consolidate them into just five, but I would say to expect the unexpected and be prepared to adapt. Life is like that everywhere, but especially during fair time.

So what comes to mind is my very last fair experience at The Great Frederick Fair. Unfortunately, there was a small swine flu outbreak, and because of that, all of the barns had to be quarantined. At the time I was over 18, so I was allowed to continue caring for my animals while a lot of the younger exhibitors were not that year. We had about an extra two or three weeks of fair, and I commend our superintendents and the fair board for quickly acting and having a plan in place and then toughing it out with us.

There were a lot of parents who had to adjust their work schedules. I was fortunate enough to be in college at the time, and I was able to make those morning and evening feedings and go through the disinfection process going in and out of the barns. But I know a lot of people didn't have that ease and weren't as flexible with their schedules. I think it's important to remember that its okay, it's only temporary. You'll get through this hardship. You just have to take a step back, take a breath and come up with a plan to adapt.

What Would You Tell Your Younger Self?

Johanna Rohrer:

So if you could go back in time, Morgan, what would you tell yourself when you first started showing?

Morgan Figgins:

I think I would go back and tell eight year old Morgan that you're going to make mistakes. Everybody's going to make mistakes, the mistakes themselves aren't important. It's what you learned from them and how you correct them. That really matters. What would you tell yourself, Jo?

Johanna Rohrer:

I think back to one particular experience, I started showing hogs first. So eight year old Jo was showing production style market hogs. At the time our farm had a finishing barn, so we were very much involved in swine production at the farm level. I remember making some big changes, making the decision to buy show pigs.

When I was about 13, that summer, I particularly purchased my projects from a show pig breeder. We focused on our feeding efforts, we focused on weighing, walking the whole process, really caring for our hogs. I remember going to the first show, which was the Elizabethtown Fair that summer, and keep in mind, at this point I was about midway through my show experience. I was at that time starting to do some livestock judging in 4-H and I was kind of getting to understand more knowledge of how to evaluate livestock for quality. I knew I kind of had a shot and I thought I purchased my hogs from a show pig breeder, and prior to that point, they were a very competitive family in our area. They were very supportive of me, they would come out to help me. I think that was the first year that I ever clipped a pig for a show.

There was just a lot of learning going on and I felt a lot of pressure and it wasn't pressure to compete with everyone else. It was pressure to do really well for the breeders. It was pressure to live up to those expectations. I'll be honest. I went in my first class, showed in showmanship, had a little bit of a rough go. It didn't quite work my way, it was a big show ring, and lots of hogs kind of got lost. I remember coming into my weight class and showing my heart out and I didn't win the class, I placed second. I remember going back to the pen and thinking, I have one more class and it was with a litter mate, blue butt guilt, and went back in the next class and I was second again, and I wasn't pulled for a division. I remember just going back to the pen and I felt like I have let people down. It wasn't even letting myself down, it was like letting other people down.

So that moment was pretty hard. As a 13 year old, sometimes this stuff is hard for kids to process. I remember going back home and thinking, I have another shot at this. I have another fair to go to a few weeks later. That outcome turned out to be my first grand champion market hog that I ever showed. I share that story because I'm so thankful that I didn't win that first time. I'm so thankful that it took me some time to find the winners circle and to have that handshake because I never took any of those moments for granted moving forward.

Morgan Figgins:

I think it's also important for kids or parents listening that when you do have those community supporters, like your breeders or other livestock industry professionals, a lot of the times when they're disappointed and they show that disappointment, it's not on you, it's the judge's decision.

I think as a kid, I remember feeling the same way. It's hard to process that sometimes. I think it's important to have those conversations where you just let everyone know, its okay. It is about you, but if you gave it your all, then that's what's important.

What Do You Miss from Your Fair Experiences?

Johanna Rohrer:

So, Morgan, what do you miss the most from your fair experiences?

Morgan Figgins:

The thing that I miss the most from my fair experiences is working each year to create that bond with a new swine project. It's always a challenge at first, but once you break down those barriers, it's incredibly rewarding. I love going from not being able to touch the pig at all, to all of a sudden having their trust and being able to convince them to do pretty much anything I ask of them. What do you miss the most, Jo?

Johanna Rohrer:

COVID really made me reflect last summer because we were all pulled home, right? So the fair season looked really different. I miss the people and I think the reason why I miss the people is because I learned so much from so many industry leaders, breeders, 4-H leaders, FFA advisors over the years. I'm so appreciative of the doors that all of them opened. So I think for me just reconnecting with the people is something I'm looking forward to this summer.

Morgan Figgins:

Definitely. There are many faces that I'm looking forward to seeing this year that I have not seen in quite a while.

The Importance of 4-H and FFA Opportunities

Johanna Rohrer:

So Morgan, why do you think it's so important for today's youth to take advantage of the endless opportunities in 4-H and FFA?

Morgan Figgins:

I believe that both of these organizations provide youth with opportunities that teach important life skills that you're going to carry with you forever. I'm a big advocate for the fact that 4-H and FFA are about much more than just showing livestock and being involved with animals. I think they're a great introduction to professional behavior at a young age.

'I think they really prepare yourself, they really prepare youth for the future and how they're going to take those next steps and how you're going to handle yourself when you start going on job interviews, even if it's just for your first job in your small town. I feel that 4-H and FFA youth are more prepared to hand over that resume. They've been keeping record books, they've been writing essays, and they’re ready for writing cover letters. I think that's an experience that I wouldn't trade for the world because I wouldn't be where I'm at today without that experience.

Johanna Rohrer:

I couldn't agree more with your answer. Particularly because I attribute so much of my success today to my past experience in 4-H and FFA. I'm so thankful that there were people willing to open up opportunities and allow me to develop those life skills. Even if maybe I made the wrong choice or decision in the moment, they were able to say, its okay, just learn from it and continue to move forward. Great answer. Great advice.

Advice for Today’s Youth

Morgan Figgins:

What advice do you have for today's youth?

Johanna Rohrer:

I think it's important to take every opportunity and to take advantage of those opportunities as they come up. Get out of your comfort zone, try new things. If you're uncertain, try to find somebody who will help teach you. There's a lot of good people out there that'll help teach and guide you in that right direction so that you have a positive experience. I feel so fortunate to have grown up in a county with a 4-H educator.

He took time out of his schedule, drove us in a suburban, across the Midwest, looking at livestock at all of the great places to go look at livestock in the Midwest. I got to see other universities, I got exposed to something bigger than just Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and I will forever be so grateful of those doors being opened. For him to say, Hey, I'd like to introduce you to so-and-so or we're going to go visit this farm and have that conversation with their breeder to learn all of that wisdom and knowledge that they've gained when they're actually doing that production piece on the farm. So definitely get out of your comfort zone.

Morgan Figgins:

Yeah, that's my advice as well is to just get outside of your comfort zone and listen to the people who push you. Whether it's a peer who is pushing you to join a new club, or for me, it was my FFA advisor who meeting me as a first year FFA member as a senior didn't know really where to put me, but knew that I would compete if you put me in a competition.

So my first CDE was actually for dairy foods and I placed third in the state. He got to know me during those practices. He said, I know where to put you for the spring/summer CDEs. He put me on an agricultural communications team.

From there, I was able to go to nationals in Indianapolis with my team and represent the state of Maryland. I wouldn't be in marketing or where I'm at today without that experience that gave me the push out of my comfort zone into something new that helped me figure out what I wanted to do with my career. I'm so grateful for that. Johanna, can you tell me a little bit more about what is the 2021 Virtual Showcase?

2021 Virtual Showcase

Johanna Rohrer:

I'm so happy you asked Morgan, this is the best part of the episode guys. So this year we are inviting all of our local MidAtlantic 4-H and FFA youth to participate in our virtual essay and video contest. We call this the Farm Credit Virtual Showcase. We know how important the fair experience is, right? We've talked about it. We also know that there's a lot of effort put in behind the scenes.

So we've been working really hard this year, and we're excited to launch our contest, which will open July 15th. So this is an opportunity for you to enter an essay or a video contest about your youth livestock, dairy, horse, poultry, or rabbit projects. We love to hear about all of them. Morgan, can you talk to us a little bit about who is eligible to apply?

Morgan Figgins:

The contest is open to 4-H and FFA youth ages 8 to 18 as of January 1st, 2021 who reside within MidAtlantic Farm Credit's footprint. You can find this and more details on mafc.com/showcase or find the link in this podcasts show notes. Johanna, why should 4-H and FFA youth enter this contest?

Johanna Rohrer:

Well, it's really a great opportunity for you to showcase your new skills that you're learning this summer, and also how this experience has positively influenced your future. So we're really encouraging you guys to tell us as much as you can about your projects. We love photos, we love great videos, but we do love a good story in an essay. So pick what's best for you and plan to apply.

Morgan Figgins:

I agree. This is a great opportunity for you to share your stories and win some pretty cool prizes, which again, you can find on mafc.com/showcase.

Johanna Rohrer:

We love show boxes and prize money, right?

This or That: Fair Edition

Morgan Figgins:

Absolutely. Jo, are you ready for some fun? We're going to do a quick round, a fair version, of this or that. So to kick it off, what would you be rocking in the show ring, big hair or braids?

Johanna Rohrer:

Well, big hair wasn't quite in style when I showed, although I've been known to have a little bit of big hair every now and then, so I'm going to go big hair.

Morgan Figgins:

I think I have to go with the classic braids. I started out strong at eight with French braided pigtails, and I developed it into a little bit more stylish of a braid, but I'm all for something that's going to keep my hair out of my face and out of my pig's mouth when I bend down to check on them.

Johanna Rohrer:

What about Twisted X boots, Hey Dudes or square toes?

Morgan Figgins:

I think I'm going to have to go with the classic square toe because we all know it hurts when an animal steps on your foot. I don't think I'm tough enough to take that in Hey Dudes.

Johanna Rohrer:

That's wise advice, Morgan. I tend to be a Twisted X kind of girl for casual wear, but if I'm in the show ring or at a judging contest, I was rocking the square toes. For sure.

Morgan Figgins:

Now this one might be a little hard for you. Pigs, sheep, goats, or beef?

Johanna Rohrer:

That's impossible. Why did you ask me that? I will say none of them or actually all of them because for me, I really love to look at good livestock. There is something about that that lights me up and gets me super excited about being involved in the livestock industry. I think when you see a really good one, it doesn't matter. It doesn't matter if they’re a goat, it doesn't matter if they're a beef heifer or a good market lamb or a good gilt, they get me really excited so all of them.

Morgan Figgins:

That's really great. I'm biased and I'm not afraid to admit it, I'm pigs all away. They've always been my favorite. One of my favorite animals to me, they're just oversized dogs. I love putting them through the paces and seeing what I can teach them.

Johanna Rohrer:

How about milkshakes or fries at the fair?

Morgan Figgins:

I'm going to have to go with the classic, hand-cut fresh fries from some of my favorite places at The Great Frederick Fair. What about you, Jo?

Johanna Rohrer:

I'm definitely a milkshake girl. I think because we have the state farm show in Pennsylvania. PA

Dairyman's milkshake makes my experience.

Morgan Figgins:

Now, another very important question, funnel cake, or fried Oreos when you're looking for something sweet?

Johanna Rohrer:

Totally funnel cake. How about you?

Morgan Figgins:

Absolutely, fried Oreos just don't have that consistency. Sometimes they're a little mushy and whenever I've needed one, a funnel cake has been there for me. Another very important question. Fair rides versus animal exhibits.

Johanna Rohrer:

Pretty sure you know the answer, but I'm going with animal exhibits. I'm actually not sure I've ever ridden a ride at a fair. So I think that says a lot about me.

Morgan Figgins:

Absolutely. I've ridden one once. You're not missing out on too much, but this is coming from someone who for the first, I don’t even know how many years of my show career, didn't even step foot into the ride section of The Great Frederick Fair, because my parents made it very clear that it was all about the animals.

As I've gotten older, I've learned to appreciate that. It truly is about providing the public with experiences that they can't get anywhere else.

Johanna Rohrer:

Last one, your county fair or your state fair?

Morgan Figgins:

I think I've made it pretty clear in most of my answers when I've been talking, I'm loyal to The Great Frederick Fair. So I've got to go with county fair.

What Do You Advocate For in Agriculture?

Johanna Rohrer:

I think for me, I really love the Pennsylvania farm show. I love the idea of getting to compete with everyone from across the state. I guess maybe to the reason why I love it is because there's just such an opportunity to see really high quality livestock and to really celebrate some really big achievements. So we've got some cool things going on at MidAtlantic Farm Credit. We've got this awesome virtual showcase going on. So for everybody, don't forget about that, but I know we typically wrap up our podcast with one question. Morgan, I'm going to let you go first, what do you advocate for in agriculture?

Morgan Figgins:

In Ag, I advocate for telling the story behind the product there are so many people that don't know the long days and nights that go into the food we eat and the products that we use every day. I think it's very important to continue to find those farmers that are willing to share their stories with the public and give them a platform to be heard. Johanna, what do you advocate for in agriculture?

Johanna Rohrer:

I advocate for all farm families today and for the future. I seek the opportunity to support and develop those learning opportunities to enhance agriculture and to ensure that our communities are supplied with a safe, wholesome supply of high quality agricultural goods.

Morgan Figgins:

That's such a great way to wrap this episode up. Now don't forget to go out there, rate, review, subscribe, and share this podcast with a friend. If you'd like to get the podcast notes and subscribe to email alerts, you can do that at mafc.com/podcast. If you have any topic or guest suggestions, please email those to podcast@mafc.com.

Johanna Rohrer:

Thanks, Morgan. For those of you getting ready to compete at your local fairs, good luck. And remember, don't forget to apply for the 2021 Virtual Farm Credit Showcase.

Morgan Figgins:

Thanks so much for joining me today, Johanna.